Deploying Box for Office Integration using SCCM – Part 1

This is likely something that’ll be rolled out in our organisation soon which is why I wanted to try this out in my lab beforehand.

We’ll start off with a high level overview of how I plan to meet the pre-requisites for this application and then proceed to implementing that in SCCM. This will probably be a pretty long post so I won’t be providing step by step instructions. Part 2 will cover creating the Box for Office Integration application, setting the application dependencies and testing our deployment.

Let’s take a look at the Box for Office integration pre-requisites:

Now, let’s take a look at how we plan on meeting these prerequisites for the deployment:

  • We’ll create three device collections to identify computers with office 2010 or higher, each limited to Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 computer collections respectively. This will allow us to deploy the application to one collection at a time. Each collection will only contain computers with Windows 7 or higher AND Office 2010 or higher.
  • We can safely disregard the Windows Installer requirement since the installer version is greater than 4.5 on all our operating systems in our collections by default
  • We’ll create separate applications for the .NET Framework 4.0 and the Visual Studio 2010 Tools for Office Runtime in SCCM. For each application we’ll set the detection rule to check for the presence of specific registry keys/values in order to detect if the application is installed or not.

This will effectively meet all the prerequisites and we can proceed with deploying the application in Part 2. Now, let’s get onto implementing this in SCCM.

1) Create the Collections to Deploy the Application To

We’ll start off by creating separate device collections for Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 computers. We’ll then create three collections with Office 2010 or higher installed and limit each to the Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 device collections respectively.

a) Create a device collection each for Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10:

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The WQL queries to use for each OS version is provided below:

Windows 7

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like "%Workstation 6.1%"

Windows 8.1

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like "%Workstation 6.3%"

Windows 10

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like "%Workstation 10%"

b) Create a second set of device collections with Office 2010 or higher for each OS

Create the first collection and name it “Office 2010 or higher installed on Windows 7 computers” and limit it to the Windows 7 computers collection.

Use the following WQL query:

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS on SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.DisplayName like "%Microsoft Office Professional Plus%" and (SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.Version like "%14%" or SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.Version like "%15%" or SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.Version like "%16%")

This is what the criteria tab should look like:

clip_image003

Now, copy the collection and rename it “Office 2010 or higher installed on Windows 8.1 computers” and limit it to the Windows 8.1 computers collection, like below:

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Once again copy the collection and rename it to “Office 2010 or higher installed on Windows 10 computers” and limit it to the Windows 10 computers collection, like below:

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You should end up with something like this at the end:

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(None of my Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 test VMs have Office 2010 installed hence why the collections are empty in the screenshot)

The idea is to deploy the Box Integration for Office application to these collections one by one (once the application is ready to be deployed).

2) Create the Dependent Applications in SCCM

This is where things get interesting. The idea is to first add these as separate applications in SCCM which will allow us to set these as dependent applications for our Box Integration for Office app later on. This way when we deploy the Box Integration for Office application it will first check if the dependent applications are installed on the target computer. If any one of the dependent application isn’t installed then these will be installed first before proceeding with the Box Integration for Office installation.

The trick here is to use the correct detection method. As in, how exactly will it detect whether the dependent application is installed or not? You can check for the existence of a file or exe, or the presence of a registry key, etc.

a) Create the .NET Framework 4.0 Application in SCCM

I’ve already written a post on deploying the .NET Framework 4.0 using SCCM which also covers the detection method. Follow the post carefully to add the application and pay particular attention to the detection method since that can make or break our deployment.

2) Create the Visual Studio 2010 Tools for Office Runtime Application in SCCM

The process of creating this application is almost exactly the same as described in the post on deploying the .NET Framework 4.0 using SCCM.

When following the above post, make sure to change the installation program and uninstall program to the following:

Installation program: “vstor_redist.exe” /Q

Uninstall program: “vstor_redist.exe” /QU

clip_image008

Also, when it comes to the detection method create the following detection rule:

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This concludes Part 1 of this series. In Part 2 we’ll take a look at creating our final Box for Office Integration application and deploying it to our collections.

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