Obtaining and Importing Drivers in SCCM for HP Client Devices

I quickly found while using the HP Client Integration Kit that, though the tool makes it easy to download and import drivers, the size of the resulting drivers and packages is excessively big. Using the HP EliteBook 820 G3 as an example device, when using the HP CIK the resulting size of the drivers is 2.3GB for this laptop compared to 823MB using the method I’ll describe in this post.

In this post we will:

  • Obtain the drivers for our device
  • Import the drivers into SCCM and create a driver package
  • Configure a task sequence to install the driver package
  • Set rules in the task sequence to only install this driver package on HP EliteBook 820 G3 laptops

I will assume you already have a Task Sequence created to build your Windows computer.

Obtaining the Drivers

I use the 820 G3 as an example here but you can adapt this for any make and model. This is a hands-on method of obtaining drivers which does take a little time but I’ve found this gives me the best result during OSD and less driver bloat.

1) Install HP Support Assistant and install any driver updates on your client device

2) Install Intel Driver Update Utility and install any updated drivers, if available

3) (Optional) Install drivers from third party manufacturers.

This step is more manual so will take some time which is why I’ve marked it as optional. This is preferable if you want to make sure you want to start off with the latest drivers for your devices in your SCCM database.

Open up Device Manager and identify devices from third party manufacturers like Broadcom, AMD, Realtek, etc. Go to each of their website and check if there’s a more recent driver available and install them.

4) Backup your installed drivers using Double Driver.

Double Driver basically scans your current system, identifies your device drivers and backs them up for you which you can then use with SCCM. I’ve been using Double Driver for a few years now but didn’t think of using this with SCCM until very recently.

Download the portable tool and run it on your client device. Click on Backup > Scan Current System and wait for the tool to identify your device drivers.

Here is a screenshot of the drivers identified on the HP EliteBook 820 G3:

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Click on “Backup Now” and choose a destination to store your drivers. Make sure you leave the “Structured folder (default)” selected. Click on OK

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Keep the resulting backup drivers handy to be imported into your SCCM database

Get the Correct Model Name of the Client Device

Further along in this post we’ll create a driver package for our drivers which we’ll then use in our task sequence. We’ll need to create a rule in our task sequence to only install this driver package for this particular computer model. For this reason we’ll need to extract the correct model name of this device at this stage using the following WMI query in an elevated command prompt:

WMIC csproduct GET name

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Make a note of the result exactly as shown and keep it safe. We’ll need it further along in the post.

Create Source Folders for your Device Drivers and Driver Package

Note that before importing the drivers you need a source folder for your device drivers and a separate folder for your driver package. I always stress the importance of organising the SCCM software repository with a clear and easily identifiable folder structure to better manage your packages (or drivers in this case). Create a folder structure for your client device driver management similar to below:

Source folder for device drivers:

\\sccmserver\Source\OSD\Drivers\Device Drivers\HP\Windows 10 x64\EliteBook 820 G3

Source folder for driver packages:

\\sccmserver\Source\OSD\Drivers\Driver Packages HP\Windows 10 x64\EliteBook 820 G3

2) Copy the drivers you backed up using Double Driver into the source folder for device drivers similar to above.

Import the Drivers in SCCM and Create a Driver Package

1) Open up the SCCM console and select the Software Library workspace. Expand Operating Systems and select Drivers. Click on “Import Driver” in the ribbon

2) In the Import New Driver Wizard leave the first option selected and enter or browse to the UNC path where you copied your device drivers. In my case it’s \\sccmserver\Source\OSD\Drivers\Device Drivers\HP\Windows 10 x64\EliteBook 820 G3

Under “Specify the option for duplicate drivers” choose

clip_image009

3) Driver Details page:

Uncheck “Hide drivers that are not in a storage or network class (for boot images)”

Uncheck “Hide drivers that are not digitally signed”

Check “Enable these drivers and allow computers to install them”

Click on Categories and either select an existing category to add these drivers to or create a new category.

clip_image011

4) In the Add Drivers to Packages step we’ll create a new driver package HP EliteBook 820 G3

For the name of the package I suggest you enter a name which identifies the model of the computer and the OS and architecture the driver package is intended for.

Something like HP EliteBook 820 G3 – Windows 10 x64

Under “Path” enter or browse to the source folder you created for the driver package. In my case it’s \\sccmserver\Source\OSD\Drivers\Driver Packages HP\Windows 10 x64\EliteBook 820 G3

Finish the rest of the wizard without making any changes to the defaults (do not add any drivers to any boot images when asked).

Distribute the Driver Package to your Distribution Points

Go ahead and distribute the driver package to your DPs.

You may also want to create a folder structure in your SCCM console under Driver Packages and move your package to it. Something like Driver Packages\Windows 10 x64

Configure your Task Sequence to Install the Driver Package

I noticed this post is quite long so I’ve split it into two and moved this section into it’s own post titled Configure your Task Sequence to Install the Driver Package. You can continue with the rest of the instructions over there.

 

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